How To Raise Your Kids To Be Expert Skiers

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How To Raise Your Kids To Be Expert Skiers

When you’re ready to get serious about learning, you have several choices at your disposal; which you choose may depend on your personal situ

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When you’re ready to get serious about learning, you have several choices at your disposal; which you choose may depend on your personal situation. If you live within easy access to a ski area, definitely opt for regular, season-long lessons. Many ski areas have great deals for locals, and some school districts even have after-school programs for kids. 

“Progression” lessons (where your child picks up where he or she left off the week before) ensures growth. Be sure to pick a program that assigns the same instructor to your child each week, for consistency. If your local mountain doesn’t offer these types of lessons, consider a set of 3-5 private lessons. While more expensive, you get more done each day!

Quick Tip: Even if your kids don’t think they want to ski race competitively, consider signing them up for your local race team. Our kids learned expert ski skills through the instruction of their race club, and even though none of them wanted to race competitively later on, they have fond memories of the friends they met and the skills they learned.

If you don’t live near a ski resort, you’ll probably plan to sign your kids up for lessons while on a ski vacation. This can be a great option, too, but it’s even more essential to find consistency, since your kids are likely to forget some skills between ski vacations. Take a few minutes to research the ski school program at your resort; the best will outline each level they offer and what ski skills are met in each (so you can accurately place your child in the correct lesson for each kid). Find a ski school program that ensures the following:

  • Age level distinctions as well as ability level distinctions

  • Options for half-day programs for young kids

  • Fun elements like snow castles to play in or snow slides to ski to.

  • Start times that work for parents (early drop-off options or staggered start times work well if Mom and Dad also plan to take a lesson or join a clinic).

  • End of day reporting, where the instructor fills you in on the skills learned

Quick Tip: Look for the option to take a family ski lesson at major resorts. Listed under “private lessons,” many parents assume these lessons are costly, but when broken down, a family lesson (usually with up to six people allowed to join) can cost less than signing up all the kids for group lessons, and the whole crew can stay together and learn together.



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