Classic Podcast: Twelve Tips on Fishing Hatches that Might Surprise You

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Classic Podcast: Twelve Tips on Fishing Hatches that Might Surprise You

Editor’s note: Tom is traveling, so here’s a great classic podcast that’s full of great tips that will come in handy during the hatches of sprin

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Editor’s note: Tom is traveling, so here’s a great classic podcast that’s full of great tips that will come in handy during the hatches of spring.

This week, I take a break from interviews and do a podcast like we did in the old days by interviewing myself. It’s a shameless plug for my newest book, The Orvis Guide to Hatch Strategies: Successful Fly Fishing for Trout Without Always Matching the Hatch, published by Rizzoli/Universe. I call it “Twelve Tips on Fishing Hatches That Might Surprise You.” I’m sure that many of you agree with most of the tips, especially if you’ve spent any time chasing trout when they are feeding on insect hatches. But I am willing to bet there are a couple you may not have thought of, that run contrary to what you have heard in the past, or might even make you think that Rosenbauer guy is full of fish feces. If you don’t agree with me, I’d love to hear about it, which may produce some interesting podcasts in the future.

In the Fly Box, I answer (or try to answer) questions on how to fish small streams with a 9-foot rod, the use of tippet rings, how to avoid spending a fortune on hackle, what percent of the time you should be hooking fish that rise to your dry fly, whether to fish for steelhead in a river where they are threatened, the use of scents on flies, how to avoid foul-hooking trout, the use of loop knots in trout fishing, and delicate dry-fly presentations at short distances. There are also a couple of great letters from listeners with comments—one on angling ethics and another on how to move from trout fishing to saltwater fly fishing on the West Coast.

If you don’t see the “Play” button above, click here to listen.

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